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This video is covering the basics of R – the types of R, how to elicit R, and how to put R with single vowels. I hope it is helpful!

You can download the R Star exercise that I talk about in the last portion of the video here.

*note: when I say “Here’s a photo of your tongue” I obviously mean “picture of your tongue”. I didn’t notice that until after recording, but I’m not going back to redo the whole video because of it. 😛

Speech Tips with Ms. Petersen!

Today’s sound is L.

If you would like to try these techniques and need some words to use, you can download a free page of L words here, and FL words here. If you need more than one page, head over to Mommy Speech Therapy and check out her free word pages for every sound!

Remember:

  • “Use your tongue” – tongue needs to move UP to make the L
  • “Watch my mouth” – say the words together with your child

Hope that helps!

Coming in closely behind referrals for the ‘th’ sound (see my last video) are referrals for students who have a mild frontal lisp. A frontal lisp occurs when the /s/ sound is produced like the ‘th’ sound, with the tongue “peeking out” between the teeth instead of staying behind the teeth.

A frontal lisp is a common, developmental occurrence. It is NORMAL for many children to have this kind of lisp through second or third grade. Occasionally a student will need speech therapy for this kind of lisp, but most often kids grow out of it. It usually doesn’t interfere with a child being understood, and like I said, many times kids will develop a clear /s/ as they mature.

A frontal lisp is also something that parents or teachers could work on at home or in class.

In this video I describe three different strategies for working on a lisped /s/. If you are wanting to work on this sound with your child, check out this blog post first, which has a wonderful explanation of the steps of speech therapy. Then print out a page of /s/ words (you can use mine, or there are more of them at Mommy Speech Therapy) and then watch  my lovely video.


I was inspired last week to start making videos to teach therapy techniques for common speech errors, so that parents can work with their children at home. Boy howdy, what a good idea! (I have to give credit to Carlee Oliver, CCC-SLP for the inspiration.)

Today we are working on the /th/ sound. As I mentioned in a previous post, this is a normal error that many children make, even in elementary school. It is also fairly quick to fix, so we generally don’t qualify students for speech therapy if this is their only error. It is easy to teach visually, which makes it an ideal sound for parents/teachers to work on at home or in the classroom.

I’m still working out the kinks in this (for example, why do I turn yellow halfway through this video?), but please enjoy my first attempt at video speech therapy!

TH vs F