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You may *hear* about what we are doing *here* in room 10 this month – multiple meaning words! We did many of the activities I posted about before (CLICK HERE for the previous post) so you can check that out for more book ideas and YouTube videos.

Multiple-meaning words, otherwise known as homonyms or homophones, are words that sound the same but mean different things. Words like flour/flower, blue/blew, see/sea… Working on these words helps expand students’ vocabulary, but also increases the connections between different words within their vocabulary. Those connections contribute to overall language skills and vocabulary robustness. Working on multiple-meaning words helps students who are concrete and literal in their thinking to learn to be flexible. Words can mean more than one thing! How cool!

I found a great addition to the unit this month — a new book!

Amelia Bedelia’s First Day of School is an updated story about the same nutty character you knew as a child. I don’t often like “updates” to classic stories, but this is an exception. The original Amelia Bedelia books were great, but many of the jokes are pretty dated (“dress the chicken”, anyone?) and went right over my students’ heads. The update keeps the same nutty style, and the same misunderstanding of multiple meaning words and idioms for the humor, but uses up-to-date words and content that kids today can relate to. The class LOVED the page where Amelia Bedelia glued herself to her chair, as well as the part where she “wiggled her fingers in Clay” (instead of clay).

There are a whole series of updated “Amelia Bedelia’s First _____________” books, which I look forward to checking out. They would be a great way to follow up at home with more multiple meaning words and idioms!

This month our topic in room 10 was multiple-meaning words, otherwise known as homonyms or homophones. Words like flour/flower, blue/blew, see/sea… Working on these words helps expand students’ vocabulary, but also increases the connections between different words within their vocabulary. Those connections contribute to overall language skills and vocabulary robustness. Working on multiple-meaning words helps students who are concrete and literal in their thinking to learn to be flexible. Words can mean more than one thing! How cool!

Our first book, Dear Deer, was made of letters between Aunt Ant, and her Dear Deer friend. I put the book on the overhead, and the students enjoyed finding the homonyms on each page. The illustrations helped the more literal students understand the different meanings. Each page had a scene featuring at least one homonym pair, and telling the story of Aunt Ant’s move to live at the zoo.

Amelia Bedelia is a classic story from my childhood, about a MAID who MADE mistakes! Some of the exploits in the book are triggered by idioms (such as when Amelia Bedelia “put the lights out” by unscrewing the light bulbs and hanging them outside!), but others were homonyms (like when she “drew the curtains”… on a piece of paper!). The silliness kept the students engaged, and the fact that it was an older book gave some nice opportunities to learn new vocabulary words (like “draw the curtains” or “dress the chicken”) which most of my students had not heard before.

There are also many jokes which use homonyms for the punchline. We used this set, which is available free on TPT. There are many books featuring jokes also, such as Eight Ate.

YouTube:

Between the Lions, with Brian McKnight!

Also, homophone MAGIC!

Free products on TPT: